Friday 1 March 2024


The founder of Black Women in Science has passed away



Ndoni Mcunu, a famous researcher and the founder of Black Women in Science, died at the age of 31.The family has revealed that the environmental scientist died over the weekend in Krugersdorp. Mcunu was on vacation with friends at the Cradle of Humankind when she died, according to a statement made by her family. "A gas leak at the accommodation venue was cited as the probable cause of death by Krugersdorp police who notified the family of the death, pending the outcome of a post-mortem and the conclusion of police investigations," stated the statement.


Black women in science is a research initiative aimed at encouraging women to pursue STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) occupations, as well as mentorship and education. The NPO also strives to increase rural women's scientific education and awareness, as well as introduce female rising researchers to research possibilities. In addition, the organization issued a statement in Mcunu's honor. "We remember Ndoni for her remarkable impact on the growth of black women in science in Africa, as well as her ongoing contribution and activism in reducing the ongoing effects of climate change," the statement stated.


Ndoni Mcunu has been hailed as a trailblazer and someone who has paved the path for young black women to pursue careers in science by her peers. Mcunu died in the Cradle of Humankind from a suspected gas leak while on vacation with pals. "God, I'm trying to comprehend the lesson behind all of this and, though this is your will, I'm struggling to subscribe to it," her friend Lynette Ntuli said at her memorial on Friday at the Gracepoint Church in Midrand.


"You made her as bright as the sun - and as colourful as the flowers." "You made her so loving and caring, and you elevated her to realms she never imagined," Ntuli added. Mcunu served as a member of the secretariat development team at the South Africa North for Adaptation Research Alliance, according to her obituary, read by her relative Thulile Khanyile.


"She worked with and for Greenpeace Africa in her battle for climate justice, notably as a co-author of the Greenpeace International and Greenpeace Africa Report on extreme weather events and climate change in Africa," Khanyile added.


Ethel Phiri, the program manager for Black Women in Science (BWIS), said: "Ndoni was not just ours, but also the entire world's. "She was placed here to alter the world, not just the world of science, but the world of change that she brought to others.


"In her fight for climate justice, she worked with and for Greenpeace Africa, most notably as a co-author of the Greenpeace International and Greenpeace Africa Report on extreme weather events and climate change in Africa," Khanyile noted.


Black Women In Science (BWIS) program manager Ethel Phiri said: "Ndoni was not only ours, but the entire world's as well. "She was sent here to transform the world, not just in terms of science, but also in terms of the change she brought to others.


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